Caravaggio (1571–1610)
Basket of Fruit,
c.1599 (detail)






 



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10 OCTOBER 2013 7.30PM

DR ADAM BOWETT
At the beginning of the 18th century, London was the largest and most prosperous city in Europe. It was also the centre of England’s furniture-making industry, serving both the domestic market and a developing export trade to Europe, North America, the Mediterranean and beyond. Furniture historian Dr Adam Bowett looks in detail at the trade: its organisation, its people and its products. He considers not only the primary trades – cabinet-makers, joiners, turners and upholsterers – but also the host of suppliers and sub-contractors – carvers, japanners, brass-founders and locksmiths. Dr Bowett ihas written three books on English furniture and furniture-making, and is a consultant for the National Trust, English Heritage and the Victoria and Albert Museum as well as private clients in Britain and North America. BACKGROUND INFORMATION...

14 NOVEMBER 2013 8.00PM

HANNE SUTCLIFFE
As early as the second millennium BC, China's rulers wore superb embroidered silk costumes. In a 2500-year old tomb, archaeologists have discovered suitcases filled with exquisite costumes made for a noble lady to use in the spirit world. At that period, China also exported silk to Rome. Oriental art specialist Hanne Sutcliffe lectures widely, has regularly led tours to China and is the author of Chinese Ceramics at Lotherton Hall. In her presentation, she explores the history of these elaborately embroidered costumes and Imperial Dragon robes as they developed through the centuries.

12 DECEMBER 2013 8.00PM

ROBERT DONALD
Often, scant attention is given to the significance of what might be regarded as incidental and small details in painting and sculpture, such as fruit, flowers or casual domestic objects.   However, such details in both early and recent works can elaborate and give fuller meaning to the subject and intentions of the artist.  Robert Donald, an art teacher for 40 years, will reveal the meanings and symbolism involved in the depiction of fruit in Western Art.  He regards himself as an obsessive follower of art but not an academic art historian, so he promises to avoid an ‘ivory tower’ approach to the fascinations of the subject. BACKGROUND INFORMATION...

9 JANUARY 2014 8.00PM

SUZANNE DUNNE
Edwin Lascelles (1713-1795) commissioned the building of Harewood House in 1759 with money his father, Henry, had made in the West Indian sugar trade.  Built by the Yorkshire architect John Carr, with contributions from the best and most fashionable of 18th century artist craftsmen – interiors by  Robert Adam, furniture by Chippendale and landscaping by Capability Brown – the house was completed in 1771.  The Lascelles have lIved at Harewood House ever since.  Suzanne Dunne, a guide and steward at the house for the past ten years, traces the relationship between the family and Harewood over the last two-and-a-half centuries. BACKGROUND INFORMATION...

13 FEBRUARY 2014 8.00PM

DR DAVID ALLEN
John Custance (1749–1822) lived at Weston House in Weston Longville near Norwich. He and his ancestry were the subject of David Allen’s doctoral research. Dr Allen, after reading History at Cambridge, worked in teaching and management before becoming a senior curator and consultant for English Heritage. He has a fascination with all aspects of Georgian life. For this presentation, Dr Allen will bring numerous Georgian items illustrating the essence of a Georgian gentleman. BACKGROUND INFORMATION...

13 MARCH 2014 8.00PM

CAROLINE BOOM
A collector and dealer for over 30 years, Caroline Boom has come to know and love the work of Georg Jensen (1866-1935), the noted Danish Arts & Crafts Silversmith.  She explores his life and many achievements in silver jewellery, flatware and hollow-ware, and traces the history of his studio, his designers, and how the business has developed to become what it is today. Caroline Boom has a place at The Montpellier Mews Antique Centre in Harrogate where she has a selection of Georg Jensen and Art Nouveau items for sale. BACKGROUND INFORMATION...

10 APRIL 2014 7.30PM

CHARLES R HAJDAMACH
Emile Gallé and René Lalique were two of the greatest glassmakers the world has ever known. Gallé was the founder of the Art Nouveau style in cameo glass with his mysterious, moody and surreal images of nature.  Lalique, also inspired by nature, used it as a graphic designer to create some of the most iconic, sophisticated and chic images of the Art Deco period. The Frenchmen’s achievements are examined in detail in this exquisitely illustrated lecture. Charles Hajdamach, formerly the Director of Broadfield House Glass Museum, is one of the leading authorities on glass in Britain and has written the two standard works on British glass of the 19th and 20th centuries. BACKGROUND INFORMATION...

PRECEDED BY THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

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